New Resume and Job Search Websites for you to Read, Review, Analyse, Learn, and Enhance your Career and Job Search!

I’ve created four new websites that are specifically targeting helping the job searcher to enhance their career search with new tips, hints, secrets and ideas to find that ‘perfect’ new job.

Do visit them – they are all in the ‘building stage’ now – so if there is anything you want to know or learn about – DO post a comment or question!

 

http://www.write-a-perfect-resume.com

 

http://www.how-to-write-resumes.com

 

http://www.perfect-job-resume.com

 

http://LearnToWriteGreatResumes.com

 

See you there!

 

Dawn Boyer, (PhD/ABD)

 

Small Business Human Resources, Career Consultant, and LinkedIn Social Media Coach

Consulting to general small businesses, 8(a) and set-aside small defense companies, resume writing coaching for job seekers, social media management and training (LinkedIn)

 

D. Boyer Consulting, Va. Beach, VA  23464 / Cell: (757) 404-8300

http://dboyerconsulting.com / Dawn.Boyer@me.com / http://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer

 

Follow me on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer / Blog:  http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

Earn referral fees: https://www.mavenresearch.com/join/RvXUnrt3; Maven Profile: http://www.maven.co/profile/uZZfANEb

Follow me in The Experts – Inside Business, Hampton Roads Business Weekly – the Experts. http://insidebiz.com/

Need a host for your domain URL?  Try: http://www.inmotionhosting.com/?intref=dboyerconsulting.com

 

Dawn Boyer is a doctoral student at Old Dominion University in the Darden College of Education, working on her PhD in Occupational Studies and Technology), as well as working as a (Doctoral) Graduate Teaching Assistant teaching computer science and technology to undergraduate students. Ms. Boyer has over 22 years of senior management experience in human resources, of which 11 years is in the defense-contracting arena. She also provides HR consulting services via D. Boyer Consulting to small entrepreneurial businesses, including dynamically growing 8(a) set-aside defense companies, resume coaching for job seekers, and social media management and training (LinkedIn) in the Hampton Roads, VA area. Her business website: http://DBoyerConsulting.com.  Her LinkedIn profile is: http://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer. She accepts all LinkedIn invites via: Dawn.Boyer@me.com. Join her 5,900+ connections!  Follow her on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer.  Read her blogs at http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

 

Alumni benefits: What to expect when rehired

Companies rehire alumni employees because it is beneficial in multi-faceted ways.  Cost savings occur in orientation savings and reduced hours spent on training and recruiting overhead.  Some large corporations have created ‘alumni’ recruiting websites to keep up with ex-employees and use their connections. They use ex-employees’ continued loyalty to the corporation to recruit new hires or rehire employees who may now have valuable new skill sets or experience.  This benefits not only the company, but also the rehire. For example, a seamless benefits reinstatement – if the alumnus has been gone for only a short period.

Savings for HR results in a reduced need for background checks. The alumni employee has already been researched. Or, the time period between termination and rehire was so short a new background check is duplicative. There may be no referrals to call because the alumni’s tenure with the company speaks for itself.  Fewer man-hours are spent on a recruiter’s full-life-cycle of tasks normally required.

The cost of training is minimized, unless the alumnus has missed major changes to policies, markets, products or services.  Many rehires can simply pick up where they were.  Unless the alumnus is placed in a new job or department, there is no need to re-train them on most corporate policies or techniques.  The IT department minimizes overhead costs by reactivating e-mail addresses, access to servers or employee portal, or previous permissions for tasking.

When alumni employees return, whether for an old job or a different position (new department or geographic area), initial expectations may be everything will be the status quo.  If the rehire has been gone more than a month, changes may have occurred as part of a company’s cost-cutting and streamlining, of which the alumni needs to be aware before they sign the re-hire offer of employment.  It is vital Human Resources (HR) or the rehiring manager communicate changes, expectations, and any variation of benefits to the rehire, either during the final interview for a rehire, or within the rehire offer letter.

Offer letters have an annual salary noted, but many companies don’t detail benefits, except to note entitlements to benefits provided to all full-time (and/or designated benefits for part-time) workers.  If there has been an open enrollment period, then co-payments, premium costs, co-payments, or provided benefits may have changed and need to be communicated. Rehired employees usually slip through the communication cracks in the HR department, so alumni has the onus to inquire.

If the employee has been absent for less than 30 days, the employer might be able to re-instate the alumnus or ‘make whole’ without a lot of paperwork.  The insurance vendor might not yet have been notified the employee has left.  If the employee has been gone for over 30 days and enrolled for COBRA, they should have received information about changes in the benefits coverage. If there is no break in insurance, there should be 100% coverage when they re-convert the employee back to the same plan. If the rehire did not elect COBRA benefits and there is a gap of coverage over 30 days, they will be considered a new employee and will most likely have to make elections as a new hire.  This might be to the benefit of the rehire if they don’t have to worry about pre-existing conditions, but may result in a waiting period if there are pre-existing conditions not covered by the recent health care act.

Rehired alumni may be able to negotiate a higher baseline salary; but the company could offer the same salary because they are still struggling. If an alumnus is offered a lower salary, they should remind the employer the cost of a rehire will be drastically reduced compared to a new hire, based on less orientation, retraining, and background checks needed by a recruiter.  This provides a modicum of power to negotiate a higher salary or reinstatement to the status quo.

The employer may wish to consider offering stock options and vesting stock. They may not be able to offer a higher salary, but may have the ability to future incentives via investment. The stock may eventually exceed the ‘lost’ value of the higher or status quo salary.  The alumni takes the gamble the company’s worth will increase when the economy gets better, there is a gain in sales for a new product or service, or even a back-burner R&D project starts to produce. The bet might even revolve around the alumnus’ ability to increase sales.

Employees expect vacation (Paid Time Off [PTO]) and possibly sick leave (if separate from PTO accrual) as part of their benefits rehire package. Employees absent for a short-term period will want their accrual rate reinstated – especially if it was at a higher rate than new hires.  Employees earning three, four, or five weeks of vacation annually will want that reinstated (or grandfathered).  This should be discussed in the final interview, and written into the offer of rehire, so there is no misinterpretation.  If the company is struggling financially, or the alumnus has been gone for several years, HR may insist the rehire restart the PTO accrual rate from the baseline.

Employees love extra benefits offered by employers such as tuition reimbursement or training cost reimbursement.  The company may have tenure restrictions for these benefits, so the alumnus needs to ask for any restrictions to be lifted as part of the rehire offer.  This will ‘make whole’ benefits attained before the employee left.

Many rehired employees have the capacity to negotiate from a point of strength with employers who wish to rehire them.  Smart job seekers can regain benefits, higher salaries, and other tenured perks, if the company has the financial capacity.  No company is legally obligated to provide the grandfathering of benefits, privileges, or perks. But offering these in small or incremental amounts could be a deciding factor to hiring back a special skills or unique employee that can give the company an edge against the competition.  Alumnus should get everything negotiated in the final interview for an offer of (rehire) employment letter so there is no misunderstanding once onboard.

Dawn Boyer is the owner of D. Boyer Consulting (http://dboyerconsulting.com), a human resources consulting firm for small business and 8(a) government contracting companies.  She can be reached at Dawn.Boyer@me.com.

 

New LinkedIn Class this upcoming Thursday, 9/23/2010 Va. Beach, VA

Build a LinkedIn POWER PROFILE That Will

Get You NOTICED

Thursday, September 23, 2010

(late morning or early evening)

FINALLY!  Training Sessions Designed To Promote YOU!

Do you want to learn?

  • How do you create a LinkedIn Power profile that will get you noticed?
  • Do you want to build a bigger, better, profile that will draw attention to you and/or your company or business?
  • How to establish your credibility as a subject matter expert in your social community?
  • How and why do you join groups?
  • How to find a job or research a company?
  • … and so much more
SIGN UP TODAY!

Space is limited for each of the two-hour sessions.

LOCATION:

College Park Executive Suites, LLC (CPES)

900 Commonwealth Place, Suite 200

Virginia Beach, VA 23464 VALUE PROPOSITION: Business Profits or a Headhunters Goldmine (You!) Presenter: Dawn Boyer THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 Organizer: Karen Clements TIME CLASS

  • 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
LinkedIn Power Profiles
  • 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
LinkedIn Power Profiles About the Hostess: RSVP Today!

http://linkedin9-23.eventbrite.com/

Price: Only $30.00 pre-paid, $40.00 at the door. College Park Executive Suites Owner/Manager, Jackie Gilmartin, is hosting this event.

Take time to look around while you are here.  CPES has full-service executive suites with a professional image to accommodate your business needs.

Are attending job fairs still useful in this electronic age of resume posting? (Part 2)

Are attending job fairs still useful in this electronic age of resume posting? (Part 2)

Part 1 (http://tinyurl.com/244uqse) imparted knowledge about why employers attend job fairs, and this article will explain why job seekers should attend, even though they think they are a waste of time.

Job fairs are common in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Chesapeake.  Some folks travel from other places to attend, or they drive to Washington, DC or the “triangle” in North Carolina for what they think may be a good venue.  I’ve hear many job seekers complain that a job fair wasn’t up to snuff, they wasted their money, employers didn’t have any jobs, no one accepted resumes, or wanted to interview them. Walking in, have zero expectations, but prepare for positive actions you can take to make it worth your while, regardless of the number or type of employees and their interest or number of current job openings.

What to take to a job fair?  Hard copy resumes for those few companies decide to review it or keep it.  Make sure cell and/or home phone numbers and an email address is at the top.  If you can obtain some business cards (with a concise list of capabilities on the back of the card and your website URL for your resume), provide those at each booth.  Dress for success at these events – do not walk in the door in sloppy clothes, leisure wear, or beach get-up.

Actions to take at a job fair to get that return on investment and make yourself memorable:

  • Speakers and special presentations for free to attendees – soak up the knowledge for even the tiniest golden nugget you can carry away
  • Visit every booth – regardless of whether you have an interest in or have even heard of the company
  • Talk to and listen to each employer representative – ask if the company has subsidiaries/partners, who might not be at the job fair, who may have job openings
  • Recognize that many employer representatives at job fairs are non-HR or non-recruiters who were told to be there to man the booth and may know little about any job openings or even about the company itself
  • Ask for names within the company; and if you know anyone in the company – ask about them, their health, how you can get in touch with them (see part 3)
  • Ask representatives to glance over your resume for any advice they can offer if they won’t take the physical hard copy at the job fair event (most prescribe online posting)
  • Get a business card from everyone in the room (see part 3)
  • Practice your elevator speech – you have 60 seconds to make yourself memorable
  • Research every company by picking up company information you will need later (see part 3)
  • Talk to other attendees – if someone notes they are leaving XYZ company – there’s going to be a job opening soon (see part 3)
  • Find out if the company is looking for candidates for now or further down the road; are contracts ending or beginning; are the company ranks expanding or shrinking
  • Don’t expect any interviews at job fairs – usually there are too few reps manning the booth to afford quiet, to-the-side mini-interviews
  • Soak up the give-away goodies offered at the job fair – if for nothing else, to walk away with something useful (flashlights, yellow highlighters, refrigerator magnet clips, thumb drives, etc.) – but don’t grab and run – make sure you do spend time with rep, ask politely what they are giving away, and thank them for the item

Make the time you spend at job fairs memorable, useful, and work for the return on investment (ROI) and you will gain that new job sooner rather than later.

Stayed tuned for Part 3 in the next article.  Tell your friends to read these articles!  Share the information and fun!

For more related articles by this author:

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 1) – http://tinyurl.com/244uqse

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 2) – http://tinyurl.com/343f8tu

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 3) – http://tinyurl.com/28bwrby

How many types of resumes should one have? – http://tinyurl.com/2eby5gr

Dawn Boyer, Small Business HR, Career, and LinkedIn Social Media Coach

D. Boyer Consulting, Va. Beach, VA  23464

Dawn.Boyer@me.comhttp://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer

Follow me on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer

Blog:  http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

Examiner Career Coach:  http://www.examiner.com/x-56052-Norfolk-Career-Coach-Examiner

Are attending job fairs still useful in this electronic age of resume posting? (part 1)

You may subscribe to these Career Articles by going to the Examiner.com and signing up for notification of new articles by this author or subscribing to the RSS feed.  Examiner Career Coach:  http://www.examiner.com/x-56052-Norfolk-Career-Coach-Examiner

Are attending job fairs still useful in this electronic age of resume posting? (Part 1)

There are many mixed feelings about whether job fairs are a ‘waste of time’ for the employers or the job seekers nowadays.  Job fairs are getting quite expensive for companies to attend and set up a booth, they are still attending to look for qualified job candidates for open positions.  Job seekers attend and get the impression there wasn’t anything in it for them.  There are still advantages for both parties.  I’ll break this down to two parts – one will list the employer’s and the second will list the job seeker’s advantages.

Why do employers still attend job fairs in this electronic technology age? Most companies now have online resume ATS (automated tracking systems) for recruiting efforts to handle the deluge of job applicants for every job posted.  These electronic resume databases assist recruiters in finding the best applicant for an open position based on key skill words and queries they perform on those key words. But they still attend job fairs for several reasons:

  • The employer is desperate to fill a position ‘yesterday’ and has loaded its guns with several managers to find a candidate and interview them immediately (meaning some employers might not be on a attending list, but get in last minute)
  • Employers wish to get their list of job openings virally marketed. Hard-copy lists do get circulated by job fair attendees to their friends, family, peers, and co-workers
  • Branding the company, get their name ‘out there,’ become recognizable to future job applicants when the time comes to solicit their resumes and recruit for positions
  • To give attendees an idea of the type of people who work for the companies, to get warm fuzzies from those attending the job fair and visiting the company booth
  • Recruiting for affirmative action applicants to balance out deltas in AAP staffing and to document and prove the company has made efforts in recruiting those candidates
  • To ‘resume farm’ for potential job openings in the future, even if they are not open or posted now, to encourage today’s job seekers to load resumes into the online system for future consideration
  • To ‘peek’ at other companies in the same business arena (industrial spying ‘lite’) to see what jobs are open or for which they are ‘resume farming’
  • Employers may have already paid for the job fair booth months ago, and they don’t want to waste money they can’t get refunded (sometimes employers don’t bother showing up if it costs more to fly in a recruiter with no jobs to fill)
  • Human resources departments schedule a minimum number of recruiting activities annually, and job fairs may be on the list for currently funded events (and they want to get out of the office occasionally)

Many job seekers are stymied employers no longer accept hard-copy resumes – especially those in the defense contracting industry.  There is a relatively new law enforced by the OFCCP, EEOC, and DOL agencies driving this decision. Any hard copy resume accepted (in a job fair) is a ‘considered for hire’ candidate, whether qualified for the job or not, and thus EEOC information must be recorded and documented.  What does this mean to the process?  Companies circumvent the time-consuming, manual recording of candidate information by forcing job seekers to apply online where the information is automated, self-reported, provide easier to compile reports, and unqualified candidates can easily be disqualified in the system with a toggle of a button.

Stayed tuned for Part 2 in the next article:

How many types of resumes should one have?  http://tinyurl.com/2eby5gr

Dawn Boyer, Small Business HR, Career, and LinkedIn Social Media Coach

D. Boyer Consulting, 5428 Whitehurst Arch, Va. Beach, VA  23464

Dawn.Boyer@me.com / Cell: (757) 404-8300

http://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer

Follow me on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer

Blog:  http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

Dawn Boyer is a doctoral student at Old Dominion University in the Darden College of Education, working on her PhD in Occupational Studies and Technology), as well as working as a (Doctoral) Graduate Teaching Assistant teaching computer science and technology to undergraduate students. Ms. Boyer has over 20 years of senior management experience in human resources, of which nine years is in the defense-contracting arena. She also provides HR consulting services via D. Boyer Consulting to small businesses, including dynamically growing 8(a) set-aside defense companies, in the Hampton Roads, Virginia area. Her LinkedIn profile is: http://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer. She accepts all LinkedIn invites via: Dawn.Boyer@me.com. Join her 4,600+ connections!  Follow her on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer.  Read her blogs at http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com.

POWER RESUME WRITING & POSTING TIPS SEMINAR

Do you have questions on how to write a resume and how to get your resume on the top of the pile?

If so, keep reading.

Questions about the value of our seminar:

* Have you always kept the length to 1-2 pages because that is what career counselors and books have advised you?

* Do you read numerous books on resume writing and have not seen any “new” ideas – just old and rehashed one?

* Are you only listing job “tasks” in employment experience sections?

* Are you confused about what is a Bio, C.V. and/or a Resume?

* Did you know you should have two types of resumes?

* Need POWERFUL NEW ideas to get your resume noticed?

* What happens after loading your resume into an online resume database/recruiting page?

* Are there questions you always wanted to ask a recruiter about how they do their job?

Agenda:

* Journalizing your resume for metrics/statistics

* Ideas to improve electronic resume presence

* Special knowledge – recruiters / headhunters

* Tips and tricks – to get seen in electronic databases

* Avoid mistakes and dependence on big job boards

* Find yourself on Internet before future employers

* Lists of large employers

* How to find POC’s in companies you want to work for

* Avoid the crowd so recruiters can find you easier

plus more….

Sign up today, as space is limited to ONLY 24 SEATS for our 2-hour seminar.

ITT Technical Institute

863 Glenrock Road

Norfolk, VA  23502

(Across from Costco, 2nd floor, Theory 1 room)

Only $20.00 for early bird registration and if space is available $30 at the door.

Hurry and get this incredible information today.

Register:

http://resume6-19.eventbrite.com

Presenter:  Dawn Boyer

Organizer:  Karen Clements

Resume Presentation Flyer_June 2010

Building the Perfect Cover Letter for your Resume

A resume is the tool that you use to sell yourself. A cover letter is the first contact you will have with a potential employer and can be used to ‘market’ your resume.  Cover letters are the headline that entices recruiters to read the rest of the ad – the window dressing that gets them in the store. If someone can’t sell himself or herself effectively, they won’t be able to represent a company to their clients, either.

It is important to address the letter to the correct person and to succinctly summarize – not simply reiterate – information on your resume.   Don’t duplicate what’s already in your resume.

The cover letters needs a ‘hook,’ nothing too over the top, but something that SHOWS not TELLS the recipient you really are must-see candidate. The cover letter should be brief and outline the position(s) you are interested in and key qualifications. The resume should contain a summary of key expertise and a detailed account of work experience and education.  Perform a line item-by-line item analysis of your experience and skills as they directly apply to the job description. For instance, if there are eight different sentences in the qualifications, attempt to treat each as a question and answer it accordingly.

Cover letter points:

  1. To get the attention of the employer – your cover letter is the place to let your enthusiasm for the position shine through. Don’t let the opportunity to communicate with your potential employer go to waste!  Contact human resources department of the company and get the name of a recruiter or hiring manager from the department you are interested in and addressing the letter directly to them. This shows you did some homework prior to simply “dropping off an application.”  Make sure the reader knows the position for which you are applying in the first two sentences.
  2. Where you heard about the position (for tracking purposes) – Tell the employer how you know about the position. Was it a referral by a friend or a current employee? Mention their name! If you found the position in the newspaper – refer to the ad.
  3. To introduce yourself and tell the employer why you are writing.  Note your skills other candidates may not have. It’s important that you STAND OUT. What makes you specifically stand out among other candidates? What unique achievement have you accomplished at work? What special degree or certificate have you earned? What project did you have a part or lead in completing? Include it in the cover letter if it is relevant to the job you are applying to.
  4. To highlight and ‘sell’ your skills and abilities to the employer. How can you contribute to the needs of the company? Give concrete examples of how your experience and past achievements could be a positive asset for the company. If you were the top seller in your previous place of employment, say so! If you have saved your current company money, highlight this in your cover letter.  Demonstrate in the cover letter AND resume where you have applied innovative thinking and initiative, these are two very important things considered in selection.
  5. To tell the employer specifically why you want to work for their company by proving you have done your homework. Tell the reader why you want to work for this company in particular. Yes, this takes some research on your part, but it will be worth it in the end. Don’t waste space telling them about their company’s background (e.g.: “I really want to work at ABC Company, because your company is the foremost supplier of….”).
  6. Conclude with an assurance of professional service, if selected.  Thank the reader and request a follow up via phone or an interview.  Demonstrate your initiative and confidence. Promise the reader that you will follow up on the position if you do not hear from him. Let him/her know the best place to reach you and state that you will call or e-mail to follow up by a certain date. Write that date on your calendar and be sure to call if you do not hear back after sending your cover letter and resume.  Ensure contact information, including home and cell phone, at least two different e-mail addresses, where you can be reached or where a message can be left. A manager is not likely to try a number again.

A cover letter is the introductory ‘hook’ to gain interest in your resume.  Many companies are no longer using cover letters in their electronic job board resume uploads, while some others may have an option to load a separate cover letter. It would still be conducive to ‘add’ the cover letter on the last page of your electronic resume before you upload it to their Internet based database.  This allows recruiters or hiring managers to see your writing style, read about your baseline information, and determine if the person is as interesting as the cover letter and resume.

It is equally important to spend the right type of time and energy on your cover letter as much as it is on your resume.  Metrics and statistics will grab the reader’s attention more than a simple listing of tasks and responsibilities.

Good luck!

Dawn Boyer is a doctoral student at Old Dominion University in the Darden College of Education, working on her PhD in Occupational Studies and Technology), as well as working as a (Doctoral) Graduate Teaching Assistant teaching computer science and technology to undergraduate students. Ms. Boyer has over 20 years of senior management experience in human resources, nine years in the defense-contracting arena. She also provides HR consulting services via D. Boyer Consulting to small businesses, including dynamically growing 8a set-aside defense companies, in the Hampton Roads, Virginia area. Her LinkedIn profile is: http://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer. She accepts all LinkedIn invites via: Dawn.Boyer@me.com. Join her 4,600+ connections!