New Resume and Job Search Websites for you to Read, Review, Analyse, Learn, and Enhance your Career and Job Search!

I’ve created four new websites that are specifically targeting helping the job searcher to enhance their career search with new tips, hints, secrets and ideas to find that ‘perfect’ new job.

Do visit them – they are all in the ‘building stage’ now – so if there is anything you want to know or learn about – DO post a comment or question!

 

http://www.write-a-perfect-resume.com

 

http://www.how-to-write-resumes.com

 

http://www.perfect-job-resume.com

 

http://LearnToWriteGreatResumes.com

 

See you there!

 

Dawn Boyer, (PhD/ABD)

 

Small Business Human Resources, Career Consultant, and LinkedIn Social Media Coach

Consulting to general small businesses, 8(a) and set-aside small defense companies, resume writing coaching for job seekers, social media management and training (LinkedIn)

 

D. Boyer Consulting, Va. Beach, VA  23464 / Cell: (757) 404-8300

http://dboyerconsulting.com / Dawn.Boyer@me.com / http://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer

 

Follow me on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer / Blog:  http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

Earn referral fees: https://www.mavenresearch.com/join/RvXUnrt3; Maven Profile: http://www.maven.co/profile/uZZfANEb

Follow me in The Experts – Inside Business, Hampton Roads Business Weekly – the Experts. http://insidebiz.com/

Need a host for your domain URL?  Try: http://www.inmotionhosting.com/?intref=dboyerconsulting.com

 

Dawn Boyer is a doctoral student at Old Dominion University in the Darden College of Education, working on her PhD in Occupational Studies and Technology), as well as working as a (Doctoral) Graduate Teaching Assistant teaching computer science and technology to undergraduate students. Ms. Boyer has over 22 years of senior management experience in human resources, of which 11 years is in the defense-contracting arena. She also provides HR consulting services via D. Boyer Consulting to small entrepreneurial businesses, including dynamically growing 8(a) set-aside defense companies, resume coaching for job seekers, and social media management and training (LinkedIn) in the Hampton Roads, VA area. Her business website: http://DBoyerConsulting.com.  Her LinkedIn profile is: http://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer. She accepts all LinkedIn invites via: Dawn.Boyer@me.com. Join her 5,900+ connections!  Follow her on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer.  Read her blogs at http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

 

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Alumni benefits: What to expect when rehired

Companies rehire alumni employees because it is beneficial in multi-faceted ways.  Cost savings occur in orientation savings and reduced hours spent on training and recruiting overhead.  Some large corporations have created ‘alumni’ recruiting websites to keep up with ex-employees and use their connections. They use ex-employees’ continued loyalty to the corporation to recruit new hires or rehire employees who may now have valuable new skill sets or experience.  This benefits not only the company, but also the rehire. For example, a seamless benefits reinstatement – if the alumnus has been gone for only a short period.

Savings for HR results in a reduced need for background checks. The alumni employee has already been researched. Or, the time period between termination and rehire was so short a new background check is duplicative. There may be no referrals to call because the alumni’s tenure with the company speaks for itself.  Fewer man-hours are spent on a recruiter’s full-life-cycle of tasks normally required.

The cost of training is minimized, unless the alumnus has missed major changes to policies, markets, products or services.  Many rehires can simply pick up where they were.  Unless the alumnus is placed in a new job or department, there is no need to re-train them on most corporate policies or techniques.  The IT department minimizes overhead costs by reactivating e-mail addresses, access to servers or employee portal, or previous permissions for tasking.

When alumni employees return, whether for an old job or a different position (new department or geographic area), initial expectations may be everything will be the status quo.  If the rehire has been gone more than a month, changes may have occurred as part of a company’s cost-cutting and streamlining, of which the alumni needs to be aware before they sign the re-hire offer of employment.  It is vital Human Resources (HR) or the rehiring manager communicate changes, expectations, and any variation of benefits to the rehire, either during the final interview for a rehire, or within the rehire offer letter.

Offer letters have an annual salary noted, but many companies don’t detail benefits, except to note entitlements to benefits provided to all full-time (and/or designated benefits for part-time) workers.  If there has been an open enrollment period, then co-payments, premium costs, co-payments, or provided benefits may have changed and need to be communicated. Rehired employees usually slip through the communication cracks in the HR department, so alumni has the onus to inquire.

If the employee has been absent for less than 30 days, the employer might be able to re-instate the alumnus or ‘make whole’ without a lot of paperwork.  The insurance vendor might not yet have been notified the employee has left.  If the employee has been gone for over 30 days and enrolled for COBRA, they should have received information about changes in the benefits coverage. If there is no break in insurance, there should be 100% coverage when they re-convert the employee back to the same plan. If the rehire did not elect COBRA benefits and there is a gap of coverage over 30 days, they will be considered a new employee and will most likely have to make elections as a new hire.  This might be to the benefit of the rehire if they don’t have to worry about pre-existing conditions, but may result in a waiting period if there are pre-existing conditions not covered by the recent health care act.

Rehired alumni may be able to negotiate a higher baseline salary; but the company could offer the same salary because they are still struggling. If an alumnus is offered a lower salary, they should remind the employer the cost of a rehire will be drastically reduced compared to a new hire, based on less orientation, retraining, and background checks needed by a recruiter.  This provides a modicum of power to negotiate a higher salary or reinstatement to the status quo.

The employer may wish to consider offering stock options and vesting stock. They may not be able to offer a higher salary, but may have the ability to future incentives via investment. The stock may eventually exceed the ‘lost’ value of the higher or status quo salary.  The alumni takes the gamble the company’s worth will increase when the economy gets better, there is a gain in sales for a new product or service, or even a back-burner R&D project starts to produce. The bet might even revolve around the alumnus’ ability to increase sales.

Employees expect vacation (Paid Time Off [PTO]) and possibly sick leave (if separate from PTO accrual) as part of their benefits rehire package. Employees absent for a short-term period will want their accrual rate reinstated – especially if it was at a higher rate than new hires.  Employees earning three, four, or five weeks of vacation annually will want that reinstated (or grandfathered).  This should be discussed in the final interview, and written into the offer of rehire, so there is no misinterpretation.  If the company is struggling financially, or the alumnus has been gone for several years, HR may insist the rehire restart the PTO accrual rate from the baseline.

Employees love extra benefits offered by employers such as tuition reimbursement or training cost reimbursement.  The company may have tenure restrictions for these benefits, so the alumnus needs to ask for any restrictions to be lifted as part of the rehire offer.  This will ‘make whole’ benefits attained before the employee left.

Many rehired employees have the capacity to negotiate from a point of strength with employers who wish to rehire them.  Smart job seekers can regain benefits, higher salaries, and other tenured perks, if the company has the financial capacity.  No company is legally obligated to provide the grandfathering of benefits, privileges, or perks. But offering these in small or incremental amounts could be a deciding factor to hiring back a special skills or unique employee that can give the company an edge against the competition.  Alumnus should get everything negotiated in the final interview for an offer of (rehire) employment letter so there is no misunderstanding once onboard.

Dawn Boyer is the owner of D. Boyer Consulting (http://dboyerconsulting.com), a human resources consulting firm for small business and 8(a) government contracting companies.  She can be reached at Dawn.Boyer@me.com.

 

New LinkedIn Class this upcoming Thursday, 9/23/2010 Va. Beach, VA

Build a LinkedIn POWER PROFILE That Will

Get You NOTICED

Thursday, September 23, 2010

(late morning or early evening)

FINALLY!  Training Sessions Designed To Promote YOU!

Do you want to learn?

  • How do you create a LinkedIn Power profile that will get you noticed?
  • Do you want to build a bigger, better, profile that will draw attention to you and/or your company or business?
  • How to establish your credibility as a subject matter expert in your social community?
  • How and why do you join groups?
  • How to find a job or research a company?
  • … and so much more
SIGN UP TODAY!

Space is limited for each of the two-hour sessions.

LOCATION:

College Park Executive Suites, LLC (CPES)

900 Commonwealth Place, Suite 200

Virginia Beach, VA 23464 VALUE PROPOSITION: Business Profits or a Headhunters Goldmine (You!) Presenter: Dawn Boyer THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 Organizer: Karen Clements TIME CLASS

  • 10:00 am – 12:00 noon
LinkedIn Power Profiles
  • 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
LinkedIn Power Profiles About the Hostess: RSVP Today!

http://linkedin9-23.eventbrite.com/

Price: Only $30.00 pre-paid, $40.00 at the door. College Park Executive Suites Owner/Manager, Jackie Gilmartin, is hosting this event.

Take time to look around while you are here.  CPES has full-service executive suites with a professional image to accommodate your business needs.

Job Search – Career Question – Test or Audition Task Valid?

Dear Career Coach,

I am interviewing for a corporate marketing job, and have been offered a job (I think), but was asked to do “consulting” marketing feasibility study on a property as an “audition.”

The interviewing company has also asked me to give a four-week notice at my current job.

I am not even sure what to charge…what do I do?

ANSWER:

I’d take this as a test for the credibility of job offer and let the company know there need to be some understandings in place before you do the consulting study as a test / audition:

They want to see if you are savvy enough to know what a consulting job entails.  This is a test to see if you are mature and experienced enough to know there are business standards, agreements to be put into place, and understandings clearly spelled out.

You want to provide them with the best job possible, but at the same time you don’t want to waste hours of your personal time on this ‘audition’ without any compensation for your time, so you would prefer to put some caveat’s in place before you start working.

If it is for a real task the company needs doing (and would have their staff or another external consultant complete otherwise), if you do NOT get the job you will be compensated for the work completed as if you were a W-2 contractor employee, paid via a 1099.  Agree upon a fee per hour for the study and the number of hours – minimum and maximum – for which you’ll perform the work. Otherwise – as appealing as the job is, you are concerned the company is using this as an non-ethical way of getting work completed for them without having to pay for it, and you would have reservations and concerns about working for any company where this is standard behavior for their workforce recruiting methodologies.  You need to get paid for your personal time regardless of whether the completed work is exactly what they were looking for or not (if a restaurant cooks a meal and serves it – you still have to pay for it – whether you were wild about it or the meal was ‘so-so’).

The acceptable standard for providing job resignation notices is two weeks. Given that your current employer might potentially terminate you for exploring new job opportunities (if they get wind), you respectfully wish to offer your current company a two-week notice, upon receipt, signature, and return of your acknowledgement for a written job offer from the testing company.  Ask them if you were let go from your current company, would there be the opportunity to immediately start work versus waiting out the two weeks.   Otherwise, you cannot comfortably give notice to your current employer until the written job offer is in your hand. The written job offer gives you two safety nets: 1) a job you can start on a set date, or 2) written conformation of the offer if they withdraw it, so you can take them to court for damages incurred if you have given up your current job and can’t find another job for weeks (or months) and have a loss of income or are not eligible for unemployment benefits.

If the ‘testing’ company can understand your dilemma, and agree to those caveats, then I wouldn’t have any issues with the assignment. BUT, get everything in writing. Get them to sign a contract for the ‘audition’ so you can take them to court for the wages if they don’t like the project and decide not to pay for your time.  They may back out of the whole deal – but that’s a chance you have to take if you really want the job and it is an ethical offer.

What to charge for your test ‘consulting’ fees per hour?  That’s not an easy to answer question.  It all depends upon the industry, the type of task, the type of work you have to complete to get the task completed, and how much personal time you must invest to complete the project.  Specialized consultants charge between $100 to $250 an hour, while generalized consultants may only charge $50 to $150 an hour.  You can accept minimum wages if you wish – but do get paid for the work, regardless.

Good luck!

Dawn Boyer, Small Business HR, Career Advisor, and LinkedIn Social Media Coach

D. Boyer Consulting, 5428 Whitehurst Arch, Va. Beach, VA  23464

Dawn.Boyer@me.com /http://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer

Follow me on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer / Blog:  http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

Build your consultancy; earn referral fees: https://www.mavenresearch.com/join/RvXUnrt3

Dawn Boyer is a doctoral student at Old Dominion University in the Darden College of Education, working on her PhD in Occupational Studies and Technology), as well as working as a (Doctoral) Graduate Teaching Assistant teaching computer science and technology to undergraduate students. Ms. Boyer has over 20 years of senior management experience in human resources, of which nine years is in the defense-contracting arena. She also provides HR consulting services via D. Boyer Consulting to small businesses, including dynamically growing 8(a) set-aside defense companies, in the Hampton Roads, Virginia area.

Are attending job fairs still useful in this electronic age of resume posting? (Part 3)

Are attending job fairs still useful in this electronic age of resume posting? (Part 3)

Part 1 imparted knowledge about why employers attend job fairs; Part 2 related what to do productively at a job fair, and this article will tell you what to do after you leave.

I noted several actions one should perform at a job fair in Part 2 of this series, including some advice after the job fair.  These follow-up actions will give you tools and advantages above all the other job seekers who won’t know these secret tips and tricks.  These tips are good regardless of whether you attend a job fair locally or drive to another state to attend a huge or broadly advertised event.  The tips I noted are listed below with an explanation of the why you should do the next step(s).

Ask for names within the company; and if you know anyone in the company – ask about them, their health, how you can get in touch with them.

  • Start searching the Internet and social network sites like LinkedIn before the job fair to see if you can find a name of a person working in the company and their department – use that name to ask if “John Doe” has any jobs in their department requiring your capabilities that hasn’t been posted.
  • If you get a name from the job fair rep, perform a Boolean search on the Internet (and LinkedIn) for that direct contact in human resources, recruiting, or other departments to contact directly to forward a resume.
  • If the POC other than HR gets a resume, and pushes it to a recruiter, there is a higher likelihood the person will forward it to HR, which may be perceived as a referral – especially if the company provides referral bonuses.

Get a business card from everyone in the room

  • Your job at a job fair is to find point of contacts (POC’s) – so pick up a card at every table.
  • Once you get those business cards, mail your resume and a cover letter to each employer POC via snail mail, thanking them for the opportunity to discuss their company and potential job openings.
  • They won’t remember you, but that’s okay – they have your hard copy resume and cover letter in hand now, and they may be nice enough to look at it for further consideration.
  • Since they have an extra printed copy now, and you noted in the cover letter you have already posted to the company’s online job site, they may be inclined to forward the package via inter-office mail to a hiring manager who may have an interest in your capabilities

Research every company by picking up company information you will need later

  • Option 1: This is one of the richest sources of finding POC information within a company – there may be a name for a CEO, VP, or program manager or addresses for work sites, where you can send notes and resumes directly.
  • Option 2: Send polite thank you notes the professionalism of the job fair rep and you wanted the executive to be aware. The executives may show the job fair rep the note. Of course the rep will want to look your profile up in the recruiting system to see who said that nice thing about them – boom, you and your credentials are now under their noses and they are reading your resume.

Talk to other attendees – if someone notes they are leaving XYZ company – there’s going to be a job opening soon

  • Some job seekers are looking to move upward to higher career levels.  If you are waiting in a job fair line, start up a friendly conversation with the next person – Are they leaving a company? Is their contract ending? Where did they work before?  Who did they work for (“…I think I remember someone who used to work for XYZ – what is your bosses’ name…”)? You might hit a gold-mine – if a  program assistant is now looking for a program manager job because they need to move on and make more money – and now you know the name of the company and what supervisor to send your resume to. That employer will need to fill a job quickly.

For more related articles by this author:

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 1) – http://tinyurl.com/244uqse

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 2) – http://tinyurl.com/343f8tu

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 3) – http://tinyurl.com/28bwrby

How many types of resumes should one have? – http://tinyurl.com/2eby5gr

Dawn Boyer, Small Business Human Resources Consultant, Career Analyst, and LinkedIn Social Media Coach

D. Boyer Consulting, Va. Beach, VA  23464

Dawn.Boyer@me.comhttp://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer

Follow me on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer

Blog:  http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

Are attending job fairs still useful in this electronic age of resume posting? (Part 2)

Are attending job fairs still useful in this electronic age of resume posting? (Part 2)

Part 1 (http://tinyurl.com/244uqse) imparted knowledge about why employers attend job fairs, and this article will explain why job seekers should attend, even though they think they are a waste of time.

Job fairs are common in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Chesapeake.  Some folks travel from other places to attend, or they drive to Washington, DC or the “triangle” in North Carolina for what they think may be a good venue.  I’ve hear many job seekers complain that a job fair wasn’t up to snuff, they wasted their money, employers didn’t have any jobs, no one accepted resumes, or wanted to interview them. Walking in, have zero expectations, but prepare for positive actions you can take to make it worth your while, regardless of the number or type of employees and their interest or number of current job openings.

What to take to a job fair?  Hard copy resumes for those few companies decide to review it or keep it.  Make sure cell and/or home phone numbers and an email address is at the top.  If you can obtain some business cards (with a concise list of capabilities on the back of the card and your website URL for your resume), provide those at each booth.  Dress for success at these events – do not walk in the door in sloppy clothes, leisure wear, or beach get-up.

Actions to take at a job fair to get that return on investment and make yourself memorable:

  • Speakers and special presentations for free to attendees – soak up the knowledge for even the tiniest golden nugget you can carry away
  • Visit every booth – regardless of whether you have an interest in or have even heard of the company
  • Talk to and listen to each employer representative – ask if the company has subsidiaries/partners, who might not be at the job fair, who may have job openings
  • Recognize that many employer representatives at job fairs are non-HR or non-recruiters who were told to be there to man the booth and may know little about any job openings or even about the company itself
  • Ask for names within the company; and if you know anyone in the company – ask about them, their health, how you can get in touch with them (see part 3)
  • Ask representatives to glance over your resume for any advice they can offer if they won’t take the physical hard copy at the job fair event (most prescribe online posting)
  • Get a business card from everyone in the room (see part 3)
  • Practice your elevator speech – you have 60 seconds to make yourself memorable
  • Research every company by picking up company information you will need later (see part 3)
  • Talk to other attendees – if someone notes they are leaving XYZ company – there’s going to be a job opening soon (see part 3)
  • Find out if the company is looking for candidates for now or further down the road; are contracts ending or beginning; are the company ranks expanding or shrinking
  • Don’t expect any interviews at job fairs – usually there are too few reps manning the booth to afford quiet, to-the-side mini-interviews
  • Soak up the give-away goodies offered at the job fair – if for nothing else, to walk away with something useful (flashlights, yellow highlighters, refrigerator magnet clips, thumb drives, etc.) – but don’t grab and run – make sure you do spend time with rep, ask politely what they are giving away, and thank them for the item

Make the time you spend at job fairs memorable, useful, and work for the return on investment (ROI) and you will gain that new job sooner rather than later.

Stayed tuned for Part 3 in the next article.  Tell your friends to read these articles!  Share the information and fun!

For more related articles by this author:

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 1) – http://tinyurl.com/244uqse

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 2) – http://tinyurl.com/343f8tu

Why attend a Job Fair? (Part 3) – http://tinyurl.com/28bwrby

How many types of resumes should one have? – http://tinyurl.com/2eby5gr

Dawn Boyer, Small Business HR, Career, and LinkedIn Social Media Coach

D. Boyer Consulting, Va. Beach, VA  23464

Dawn.Boyer@me.comhttp://www.linkedin.com/in/DawnBoyer

Follow me on Twitter: @Dawn_Boyer

Blog:  http://DawnBoyer.wordpress.com

Examiner Career Coach:  http://www.examiner.com/x-56052-Norfolk-Career-Coach-Examiner